What metformin is used for

By: snoopckuu Date: 22-Feb-2019
<strong>Metformin</strong> MedlinePlus Drug Information

Metformin MedlinePlus Drug Information

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes, and to help prevent type 2 diabetes if you're at high risk of developing it. Metformin is used when treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), although it's not officially approved for PCOS. Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body does not make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes does not work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycaemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. Metformin is classified as a biguanide is used as a first-line drug treatment for type 2 diabetes, and also for insulin resistance, PCOS, and even cancer. It is the most commonly prescribed anti-diabetic medication in the world [R]. Metformin adjusts cellular energy consumption by targeting the liver, preventing it from creating more sugar (glucose), and inhibiting a hormone (glucagon) responsible for increasing blood sugar levels. It also decreases the absorption of glucose in the gut and increases insulin sensitivity [R, R]. The effect of metformin on blood sugar levels can be attributed to AMPK, an enzyme that controls the production and storage of energy in cells by regulating when muscle cells should increase their sugar uptake from the blood [R]. Recently, attention has shifted to non-AMPK mechanisms, often involving mitochondria, the parts of cells responsible for energy production [R]. Type 2 diabetes coexists with insulin resistance and patients develop extremely high blood sugar levels.

<i>Metformin</i> medicine to treat type 2 diabetes - NHS. UK

Metformin medicine to treat type 2 diabetes - NHS. UK

The UK Prospective Diabetes Study, a large clinical trial performed in 1980-90s, provided evidence that metformin reduced the rate of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes relative to other antihyperglycemic agents. Treatment guidelines for major professional associations including the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, the European Society for Cardiology and the American Diabetes Association, now describe evidence for the cardiovascular benefits of metformin as equivocal. In 2017, the American College of Physicians's guidelines were updated to recognize metformin as the first-line treatment for type-2 diabetes. For example, a 2014 review found tentative evidence that people treated with sulfonylureas had a higher risk of severe low blood sugar events (RR 5.64), though their risk of non-fatal cardiovascular events was lower than the risk of those treated with metformin (RR 0.67). There was not enough data available at that time to determine the relative risk of death or of death from heart disease. study known as the Diabetes Prevention Program, participants were divided into groups and given either placebo, metformin, or lifestyle intervention and followed for an average of three years. Metformin treatment of people at a prediabetes stage of risk for type 2 diabetes may decrease their chances of developing the disease, although intensive physical exercise and dieting work significantly better for this purpose. The intensive program of lifestyle modifications included a 16-lesson training on dieting and exercise followed by monthly individualized sessions with the goals of decreasing weight by 7% and engaging in physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week. The incidence of diabetes was 58% lower in the lifestyle group and 31% lower in individuals given metformin. Among younger people with a higher body mass index, lifestyle modification was no more effective than metformin, and for older individuals with a lower body mass index, metformin was no better than placebo in preventing diabetes. For many people with diabetes, metformin comes first. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that doctors prescribe this medication to their newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes before trying other drugs. And yet despite being one of the most prescribed medications worldwide, metformin is not mundane. In addition to its ability to lower blood glucose—safely and inexpensively—metformin may have some other tricks up its sleeve. It continues to intrigue researchers, doctors, and patients, even after more than 15 years on the U. Recent studies suggest that it may be an antidote to everything from obesity to cancer. It's not yet clear whether this humble pill will live up to the hype, but researchers are optimistic. Type 2 diabetes is marked, in part, by insulin resistance, the body's inability to lower blood glucose levels in response to the hormone insulin. Metformin helps restore the body's ability to respond to insulin, particularly in the liver.

<i>Metformin</i> - Wikipedia

Metformin - Wikipedia

In type 2 diabetes the cells in the body, particularly muscle, fat and liver cells, become resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for controlling the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It makes cells in the body remove sugar from the blood. When the cells are resistant to insulin this makes blood sugar levels rise too high. Metformin hydrochloride is a type of antidiabetic medicine called a biguanide. It works in a number of ways to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Firstly, it increases the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Show More Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill.

<strong>Metformin</strong> <strong>used</strong> <strong>for</strong> PCOS Everything You Need to Know
Metformin used for PCOS Everything You Need to Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. Parker Boats is the manufacturer of exceptional center consoles, bay boats, and sport cabin boats. The Parker Tradition continues to deliver.

What metformin is used for
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